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September 30, 2015

Microfilm at Your Fingertips!

Microfilm at Your Fingertips!
How many of you remember "the good old days" pre-Internet when we spent hours in libraries and archives scrolling through microfilm in a dark room? I sure do! 

Now, thanks to The Internet Archive, (part of the WayBack Machine) microfilm is coming right to your computer! Here is their description of the focus of this project:

As books become old and begin to fall apart, librarians depend on microform to preserve their content for the future. Tiny photographs on long strips of film (microfilm) or small cards of film (microfiche) are all that remain of hundreds of thousands of documents that have disintegrated over the last century. While microfilm is perfect for storing and protecting this material, it is a does not allow for much access. In following its mission to provide universal access to all human knowledge, the Internet Archive is teaming up with libraries all over the world to begin digitizing microfilm and microfiche. The goal is to get as much content off the shelves and online.
The books in this collection are from a variety of libraries including the University of Chicago Libraries, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Alberta, Allen County Public Library, and the National Technical Information Service.
You may also want to view the newspapers that have been digitized from microfiche.

So don't wait, click over to https://archive.org/details/microfilm and let your fingers do the walking!

September 29, 2015

1912 Postcard Medina New York

Recently I rescued 28 vintage orphaned postcards from antique shops. They range in date from 1900 to 1918. 27 are from United States and 1 is from Ontario Canada. 

I have scanned and added 6 of these postcards to Lost Faces and will be adding the rest of these wonderful cards over the next month. I hope descendants will see these postcards and recognize an ancestor.  

Perhaps you will find an ancestor or two!

Miss Cora E. Dunn, Medina New York. to "Dear Friend" from "Bertha Brown. 1912

September 27, 2015

Nursing Sister WW1 Photo Album: 30V Captain MacLeod

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One. 

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.


Nursing Sister WW1 Photo Album: 30V Captain MacLeod


The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

September 25, 2015

No. 8 of My Top 10 Genealogy Mysteries: Joseph McGinnis

A Facebook friend posted her top 10 Genealogy Mysteries.  They aren't brick walls because there is probably an answer somewhere, just waiting to be found.

I thought this was a great idea and I am following suit with my Top 10 Genealogy Mysteries. Of course any help or suggestions for further research are welcome. You can read my other Genealogy Mysteries at Top 10 Genealogy Mysteries

Here is my Number 8 of 10 Genealogy Mysteries:

My 2nd Great-Grandfather Joseph McGinnis was born in Ireland circa 1829. Some time before 1846 he married Frances (Fanny) Downey. They had a daughter Bridget (aka Delia) born in 1845. In July 1846 they arrived in what is now present day Ontario. 

In September 1847 they baptised their daughter Fanny in Church of Our Lady in Guelph Ontario. 

They are not found in the 1851 census but many pages are missing. They are found in 1861 living in Puslinch Township, Wellington County Ontario, beside a very large McGinnis family. They are found again in 1871 in the same location. That is the last entry found for Joseph.

Joseph & Fanny (Downey) McGinnis 1871 Census Puslinch Township Wellington County Ontario

The entire family disappears after 1871 and does not reappear until 1881 or 1891. (That's part of the challenge!) 

What happened to Joseph? Did the family leave Canada for the USA (as many of the other McGinnis families who were Joseph's neighbours did)? Did Joseph die somewhere in the USA and Fanny returned to Ontario to be with her grown children? 

To add to the challenge there is a second Joseph McGinnis married to a woman named Fanny living in Guelph in the same time period. This Joseph died in Guelph in March 1877 but Church records prove that his wife was Fanny Foster (she died in Guelph in 1890 whereas my Fanny Downey did not die until 1904.) Most online trees have erroneously attached the second Joseph and Fanny's death dates to *my* Joseph and Fanny. So there are no clues to be found in other descendants' trees. 

The exact relationship of my Joseph to the other McGinnis men who were his neighbours is unknown but there  was almost certainly a relationship of some sort - brother? cousin? nephew? They were sponsors at baptisms of children. They lived on the same land. They named their children with each other's names. 

But my Joseph did not arrived until 1846 whereas the other McGinnis family arrived ca 1831.

SUMMARY OF WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT MY JOSEPH McGINNIS & FANNY DOWNEY

July 1846: arrived Puslinch township Ontario and settled on Conc. 3 Lot 10 on land owned by James McGinnis, a son of John McGinnis who owned Conc. 3 Lot 11 Puslinch Tp. Some time after arriving in Puslinch, Joseph rented a tavern called "Speed The Plow" at Conc 4 Lot 6 Puslinch Tp. on the River Speed.

Sept. 1847: daughter Fanny baptised in Catholic Church in Guelph

1851: not found in the census for Puslinch (some pages are missing)

1861: Joseph and Fanny, both age 30, with children living in Puslinch Twp.

Jan 1863 to March 1871: 4 of their children are on a list of pupils at SS # 12, Puslinch. 

1871: living with 8 children in Puslinch Twp. McGINNIS, Joseph, 46, b. Ireland, RC, Labourer and Fanny, 44, b. Ireland RC

1871-1872 Directory: Jos. McGrunnis [sic] farmer Conc 3 Lot 11

1873 Guelph City Directory shows a Joseph McGINNESS [sic], labourer, Norfolk & Cork St.. This is at the back of Church of Our Lady, below the hill. *But which Joseph is this??

1875-1877 Guelph City Directory we see a Joseph McGINNIS, living 77 Norfolk St. east side, near Cork St. *But which Joseph is this??

March 1877: Joseph McGinnis, age 38 or 48 (Death certificate says 38 but church burial record says 48), husband of Fanny Foster, dies in Guelph

1877 Directory for Guelph shows Fanny McGuiness (sic), widow, on 64 Cork St. This seems to be Fanny Foster McGinnis

1881: A widow Francis McGinnis age 49 with son Joseph age 15 is living in Guelph. My Fanny also had a younger son Robert who should have been with the family so where is he? At the same time there is another Fanny McGinnis, age 40, living in Guelph. She is a servant in a household. It is likely that one of these is my Fanny Downey McGinnis and one is Fanny Foster McGinnis

1882-83 Guelph City Directory: Fanny MAGINNIS, Mrs. widow of Joseph living 64 Cork St. near Norfolk St. Is this Fanny Foster McGinnis?

July 1890: Fanny Foster McGinnis, age 65, dies

1891: My Fanny, a widow age 60, is living with her married daughter Bridget (aka Delia) Johnston in Guelph

1901: My Fanny, a widow age 66 is living in Morriston (not far from Guelph) with her married daughter Fanny and my 2nd great-grandfather Alex McGinnis

Dec. 1904: My Fanny, 84 years old, dies

CONCLUSION

I am no further ahead with this challenging missing ancestor than I was 15 year ago. Any ideas from my readers? Many of the McGinnis men left Ontario for MIchigan and I have searched Michigan for my Joseph with no luck.

September 23, 2015

Do You Have the Long-Life Gene in Your Family?

103 year old Uncle Walter born 1912 (seated)
Yesterday was National Centenarian's Day and I'm sorry I missed it! Do you have anyone in your family, now or in the past, who lived to be 100? My Uncle Wally (my grandfather's brother) turned 103 this past summer.  Imagine living that long. If only I could chat with him about the past, about his parents, his grandparents, his brother (my grandfather). But sadly he's quite deaf and communication is challenging at best.

Do you have anyone in your family who lived to 100 years of age? What about into their 90s? My mother's sister turned 92 this year.

I have many women in my family who lived to 90+ - my mother was 93 when she died, her mother was 90, her grandmother (my great-grandmother) was 3 months away from turning 90. My 3rd great-grandmother was 90, and there are more. It seems to be mostly the women in my family and only on my mother's side, who lived to 90+

Interestingly enough when I had my DNA tested I found out that we females in my maternal line have what scientists refer to as the "long-life" gene. If you haven't tested your DNA yet, why wait? If you live in Canada, you can order a DNA kit from Ancestry DNA in Canada and if you are in USA, use this one Free Shipping on Ancestry DNA Kit w Code: FREESHIPDNA
Walter Fuller age 4

Who are your longest-living relatives? Did they live that long because of healthy diet, exercise or could it be the long-life gene at work....

Credits: 

Photograph of Walter and Harold Fuller taken ca 1914 in Ramsgate, Kent England. Owned by L. McGinnis Schulze. Note that toddlers who were not toilet trained were dressed in skirts and dresses regardless of gender. It made changing diapers easier. The way to tell if a child is a boy or girl is to look at their hair. Parted in the middle is a girl, parted on the side is a boy.

Photo of Walter Fuller age 4 taken ca 1916 in Ramsgate.  Owned by L. McGinnis Schulze.

September 22, 2015

Is this Your Ancestor? June 1879: Hugh Russell to Sarah Aldritt. Chattel Mortgage

Is this Your Ancestor? June 1879: Hugh Russell to Sarah Aldritt. Chattel Mortgage
While antique hunting I was lucky enough to come across several documents from 1879. Not wanting them to be lost, I purchased them with the plan of publishing them here on my Olive Tree Genealogy blog and on my Olive Tree Genealogy website

I'm also going to offer the originals for sale on my Antique Hunter blog, so stay tuned as I publish each document! This document is a Chattel Mortgage. 

Definition of a Chattel Mortgage: A term used to describe a loan arrangement in which an item of movable personal property is used as security for the loan. Source: http://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/chattelmortgage.asp

14 June 1879: Hugh Russell to Sarah Aldritt. Chattel Mortgage to secure the sum of $244.00, Due 14 June 1880
Abstract: Hugh Russell of the Township of Delaware, County of Middlesex to Sarah Aldritt of the Village of Aylmer in the County of Elgin, widow. Sarah is putting up horses, cows, calves, wagons and farm equipment as collateral for the loan.

Witnessed by William Augustus Glover of the Village of Aylmer, Elgin County

Lorine's Research: In November 1882 the widow Sarah Aldrit [sic] of Aylmer, Elgin County died at the age of 74. She is noted as being born in the United States. Her son's name is recorded as T. H. Davis. That clue (Davis) led me to Sarah Davis, widow, born in USA, age 73 living in Aylmer, Elgin County in 1881.

Marriage records show that in 1861 Sarah Davis, age 52, born New York and living in Malahide Twp Elgin County married James Aldritt. 1851 Census for Malahide shows Sarah Davis, born New York, age 42, widow with Emeline Davis and Truman Davis (age 21 and no doubt the T.H. Davis who was the informant at Sarah's death)

September 21, 2015

1910 Postcard Franklinville New York

Recently I rescued 28 vintage orphaned postcards from antique shops. They range in date from 1900 to 1918. 27 are from United States and 1 is from Ontario Canada. 

I have scanned and added 6 of these postcards to Lost Faces and will be adding the rest of these wonderful cards over the next month. I hope descendants will see these postcards and recognize an ancestor.  

 Perhaps you will find an ancestor or two!


Miss Bernice Baker, Franklinville New York to "Dear Little Bernice" no signature,  Sept 21, 1910.

September 20, 2015

Nursing Sister WW1 Photo Album: 31V Captain Croll

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One. 

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.


ww1 31V Captain Croll


The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

September 18, 2015

1879 Document Summers & Bartram, London Middlesex Ontario

1879 Document Summers & Bartram, London Middlesex Ontario
While antique hunting I was lucky enough to come across several documents from 1879. Not wanting them to be lost, I purchased them with the plan of publishing them here on my Olive Tree Genealogy blog and on my Olive Tree Genealogy website

I'm also going to offer the originals for sale on my Antique Hunter blog, so stay tuned as I publish each document! The first document is a Chattel Mortgage.

June 10, 1879. Thomas Summers to William Henry Bartrum (Bartram). Chattel Mortgage. London, Middlesex County Ontario

Definition of a Chattel Mortgage: A term used to describe a loan arrangement in which an item of movable personal property is used as security for the loan. Source: http://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/chattelmortgage.asp

There is a very nice list of the items that Thomas is offering as collateral for the loan. There are 2 horses, a wagon and surprisingly, 2 plots of land. What is surprising is that my understanding of a Chattel Mortgage is that land could not be offered as collateral. For a genealogist, this is gold because it provides an exact location of land that Thomas owned. 

My Research:

William Henry Bartrum/Bartram was born in England ca 1849. He can be found in the 1871 census for London Ontario. His marriage to Mary Jane barker in 1875 provides his parents' names as William and Emily. He died November 24, 1913 in the city of London in Middlesex County. His death Certificate gives his occupation as "Barrister" and his mother's maiden name as Soule. He was 65 years, 3 months and 3 days old at the time of his death.

There is more than one candidate for being the Thomas Summers of the document. 

A witness to the document was Edward Arthur Lancaster, Law Student. The only man I find that might be Edward was an Edward Arthur Lancaster born in England ca 1860. This Edward married in 1885 in Lincoln County Ontario. He was the son of Frederick and Emma Lancaster.

More research found Edward in 1901 living in Lincoln County where he is listed as a Barrister so I have no doubt it is the correct man. His wife was Mary and 4 children plus his mother Emma are living with him.  

Are You a Descendant?

This 4-page document is for sale. It is not a copy and has the original seal. Please contact me at antiquehunterblog@gmail.com for details.  

 


September 17, 2015

Score! Antique Documents 1879

Yesterday I took the day off work and went antiquing with my husband. 

I scored with a great find of several antique documents (Indentures, Mortgages, Deeds) from 1879. 

With only a quick glance through them I believe they are all for different families in different areas of Ontario Canada.

I'm very excited to start scanning and researching these documents and individuals. As soon as possible I will be putting the documents online both here on my Olive Tree Genealogy blog and on my Olive Tree Genealogy website

I'm also going to offer the originals for sale on my Antique Hunter blog, so stay tuned!

September 16, 2015

Congratulations to the Rock Star Genealogist Winners

Congratulations to the Rock Star Genealogist Winners
The RockStar Genealogists' Winners have been announced! These are the top in each geographic category. You can also see who won in 2nd and 3rd place for each geographic location. "Geographic location" refers to where the voters live,  not the category for the genealogists.

Last, but not least, you can view the top 10 as voted for by those living in Canada as well as those in Australia/New Zealand

There are mostly genealogy conference speakers on the list (and excellent ones at that!) but I was really pleased to see a few bloggers make the Top 10. 

Congratulations to all!

September 15, 2015

Possible Copyright Change Re the Lenz Decision

Olive Tree Genealogy received this notice from The SolutionPR about Copyright. Genealogy bloggers may wish to take note!

Yesterday morning the Ninth circuit ruled in  the “dancing baby case,” finding copyright owners must consider the fair use doctrine before sending Digital Millennium Copyright Act takedown notices to online hosts like YouTube.If the decision stands it will  have a massive impact on copyright law and those who choose to put digital content online.

J. Michael Keyes is an intellectual property partner at the international law firm Dorsey & Whitney with extensive trial and litigation experience in cases involving trademarks, copyrights, unfair competition and false advertising. He has tried several cases in federal courts across the United States.

Recently, Mr. Keyes and his team obtained a final judgment and permanent injunction in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida on behalf of Rovio Entertainment, Ltd., the creator of Angry Birds®. He’s been watching this case closely and of the decision says:

“The Lenz decision is a path marking case in the world of copyright law.  If a copyright holder sees unauthorized use of its content online, the natural inclination is to take appropriate steps to have that content removed (by sending a "take down" notice to the Internet Service Provider that is hosting the content, such as YouTube.com in the Lenz case).  If the Ninth Circuit decision stands, a copyright holder now must first determine if the party that posted the content has a legitimate legal defense before requesting that the material be taken down.  This is a significant development as it forces content holders to engage in a bit of copyright soothsaying before enforcing their rights,”
“What this decision means from a practical point of view is that anytime content owners see the unauthorized use of their content online (for example music, videos, etc) they will want to carefully consider their options before demanding that the content be removed.  If the party that posted the content has a reasonable argument that it's use of the content was "fair" (I.e. That the poster was commenting on the work or engaged in some sort of educational endeavor) the copyright holder faces the specter of a claim for damages if a take down notice is sent,”

September 14, 2015

How to Introduce Yourself to Other Genealogists at a Genealogy Conference



Whether or not you are attending RootsTech or another Genealogy Conference or Convention, whether you're going as a participant (speaker, presenter, etc.) or as an attendee, you should have a card. Call it what you want - a business card, a calling card, a Genealogy calling card..... but you should have one.
 

A calling card allows you to connect more easily with other genealogists. You're more accessible with your name and contact details on a card.

Do you have a blog? A website? Are you a passionate genealogist? Are you a member of some genealogy societies, a volunteer for a genealogical organization? Are you on Twitter, Facebook, Google +, Pinterest, Periscope, Instagram, LinkedIn or another social networking site? You need a card to let other genealogists know about your interests and how and where they can contact you!


Victorian Calling Card

Perhaps you aren't involved in any of the things I mentioned above. But you love genealogy and you like to meet other genealogists. You could benefit from a genealogy calling card. Think of the 19th Century when visitors handed their calling cards to servants who placed them on a silver tray for the head of the house or his wife to look at later. 

I'm not advocating anything as fancy as the Victorian calling card shown here but a simple calling card is a great introduction and a good way to ensure that genealogists you meet will remember you.
Perhaps you've sat through a wonderfully inspiring and informative presentation on a genealogy topic. You managed to introduce yourself to the presenter. She gave you her business card. Wouldn't it be great for you to hand her your calling card too? Now she has a name, an email and any other information you want to put on it, to remind her of your meeting. Who knows, maybe you'll connect in the future.

 

Or you got chatting to the genealogists sitting on either side of you. Hand them your card if you think you'd like to continue to engage with them. Maybe you went to the Conference alone and you don't know anyone there. You might decide you'd like to meet one of them for a quick supper. If your card doesn't have your cell number, you can scribble it on the back and invite a phone call or text to arrange a meetup.
 

Kerry Scott, from Clue Wagon blog, wrote a very interesting post in 2011 called What Do Modern Business Cards for Genealogists Look Like? The business cards that I printed for RootsTech 2011 were too simple.  And I wish I'd done colour for my logo, not just black and white. I like simple. I like uncluttered. But mine don't contain enough details and I may take Kerry's suggestion and remove my cell phone number. If I want someone to have that I can easily add it, because unlike Kerry my cards are not glossy and they aren't double-sided. It's a personal preference re glossy or matte, there's no right or wrong.
 

I’m a writer-on-business-cards kind of gal! I always always jot a quick note on the back after someone gives me their card – a reminder of why I wanted it, or why I might want to reconnect. It’s faster and easier for me than entering it in my iPhone. I sometimes put notes on the backs of cards I hand out - such as a URL for a site they expressed an interest in or the name of another contact, so glossy doesn't work for me. I can't write on a glossy card so matte wins.


So I'm reviewing and re-doing my Business cards this year. I've got a funky case I carry them in (thanks to my granddaughter who gave it to me in 2011) and I need to update my cards. I'm thinking I'll add my Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and Facebook information so that folks have other methods of connecting with me.

I'll keep my Olive Tree Genealogy website URL of course, and my email address. If there's room and the card isn't too cluttered, I'll add the URL for my Facebook page for Olive Tree Genealogy but that's probably all I'll have on my card.

 

Oh and no QR codes on mine. A lot of people don't know what those codes are for on a business card, and I'm not convinced of their usefulness on a card that already has the information printed. 
 This is a business card printed for a distant McGinnis cousin of mine back in the early 1900s. He used front and back to promote his business as a builder.

I hope you are going to create calling cards or business cards for your next genealogy convention or think about whether or not it's time to revise old ones. There are many online companies that print business cards for a reasonable fee. So don't wait, think about which you prefer - modern business cards or old-fashioned calling cards.  Or maybe you will surprise everyone with a combination of the two. 

September 13, 2015

Nursing Sister WW1 Photo Album: 29V Sister taking a pulse

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One. 

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.


Nursing Sister WW1 Photo Album: 29V Sister taking a pulse


The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

September 12, 2015

1918 Postcard Williamsville New York

Recently I rescued 28 vintage orphaned postcards from antique shops. They range in date from 1900 to 1918. 27 are from United States and 1 is from Ontario Canada. 

I have scanned and added more of these postcards to Lost Faces and will be adding the rest of these wonderful cards over the next month. I hope descendants will see these postcards and recognize an ancestor.  

Perhaps you will find an ancestor or two!


Mrs. Ben Hobecken, Williamsville, New York, To "Dear Aunt Ella" from Myra Hobecken in Chautaqua County 1918

September 11, 2015

Patronymics - Are they Confusing or Helpful to Genealogists?

Patronymics - Are they Confusing or Helpful to Genealogists?
Lois asked a rather convoluted question which I answered in full on my AskOliveTree blog
Below is one small section of Lois' original email, and my response:



Q: After 200 years of historical accounts of the immigrants from the Netherlands, debate is still continuing when the surname Teunise/Teunisen is researched. My ancestor was Teunis Nyssen, who had  7 children based on baptism records, one (Cornelis) from guardianship record after his mother Phoebe Janse died. By 1660, when the 2nd generation started marriage and having children, the names of daughters were Teunis with an “e” added and sons with “en”. Historians and genealogists either made decisions which person had which “Teunis” father, so for the children of Teunis Nyssen, Denyse was added to the name “de Nys, or of Nys, as opposed to child of Teunis Bogaert. 



Is my assumption on the addition of the “e” and “en” correct?
A: The simple answer is "NO". The patronymic was formed by adding -se, -sen, or -szen. Daughters would very often have the ending -x or -dr. added. I suggest that what you are finding ("e" vs "en") is simply the way the name/patronymic was recorded by that specific clerk or individual. See Dutch Patronymics of the 1600s for more help. 

Researching the Dutch in New Netherland is not an easy task. It requires years of study to understand naming patterns, customs, patronymics etc *and* to find the records to assist in the research. There are records that Dr. Gehring has been working on translating from the Dutch for over 25 years now! 


Read more of Lois' Questions and my  Responses at http://askolivetree.blogspot.com/#ixzz3lReVOowU


Photo credit: Stuart Miles on FreeDigital.Net

September 10, 2015

Don't Miss this Special on Legacy Tree Research!

Special on Legacy Tree Research!
Legacy Tree Genealogists provides treasured holiday gifts for clients and

This year, save money with $100 off any research project if ordered by December 23, 2015. Use coupon code HOLIDAY100.

Get started now to complete your project by Christmas. 

Don't wait! Order yours today at https://legacytree.com/olivetreegenealogy

Please note that holiday deadlines are as follows:

Sep 18th: RESEARCH finished by Christmas
Oct 30th: RUSH research finished by Christmas (10% additional fee)

Nov 30th: INTRO research finished by Christmas
Dec 18th: gift card MAILED and project finished later
Dec 23rd: gift card EMAILED and project finished later
 
About Legacy Tree Genealogists: founded in 2004 and based near the world’s largest family history library, Legacy Tree is the world’s highest rated professional genealogy research company. Working with researchers around the globe, Legacy Tree’s team can track down rare international records, analyze DNA test results, push back ancestry, and connect cousins. [Source: Legacy Tree]

September 9, 2015

One Genealogist Can Make A Difference!

This is a fascinating (and inspiring) story of one genealogist (Brooke Schreier Ganz) and her fight to gain access to public records. Please read the full story at Public Records Access: One Genealogist Can Make A Difference!

Ms. Ganz is  seeking access to copies of the 1908-1929 index to marriage licenses and affidavits, a series originally kept by the New York City Clerk’s office, now stored at the NYC Municipal Archives.

In her story we see what dedication and perseverance can accomplish. In the end Brooke Schreier Ganz's fight will benefit all genealogists. The Power of One is amazing!
 

September 8, 2015

Review of Alex's Wake: The Tragic Voyage of the St. Louis....


Review of Alex's Wake: The Tragic Voyage of the St. Louis....

Alex's Wake: The Tragic Voyage of the St. Louis to Flee Nazi Germany—and a Grandson’s Journey of Love and Remembrance by Martin Goldsmith.

This is the story of Alex and Helmut Goldschmidt  two of more than 900 Jewish refugees who fled Nazi Germany aboard the St. Louis in 1939. Decades later, Alex's grandson Martin Goldsmith tells the poignant tale of how the ship was denied entry into Canada, United States and Cuba. The ship returned to Europe where Alex and Helmut were sent to Auschwitz where they died.

To write his story Mr. Goldsmith traveled in his grandfather's footsteps to revisit those horrific days. It is a moving and sad story of reconnecting with the past and taking a powerful journey with his grandfather and grandfather's brother.

This wonderful book is available on Amazon at  Alex's Wake: The Tragic Voyage of the St. Louis to Flee Nazi Germany— and a Grandson’s Journey of Love and Remembrance

September 7, 2015

Vote for Your Fav Rockstar Genealogist Now!

Rockstar Genealogist Voting is now open! Hurry over and vote for your favourite genealogist from the list of nominees. 

Olive Tree Genealogy is on the list under "S" as Lorine McGinnis Schulze in case you wanted to cast a vote my way.

It's okay if you don't vote for me, but you should vote for someone. 




Image designed with Pixabay image and using WordSwag

September 6, 2015

Nursing Sister WW1 Photo Album: 29R Mess Tent

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One. 

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.


Nursing Sister WW1 Photo Album: 29R Mess Tent


The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

September 5, 2015

Searching Siblings of Your Direct Ancestors Pays Off

Searching Siblings of Your Direct Ancestors Pays Off
On my AskOliveTree Blog Pamela asked about naturalization records for her ancestor William Galbraith. 

My response can be read at Search all the Children not just your Direct Ancestor!

Feel free to send your challenging genealogy queries to AskOliveTree@gmail.com for me to answer. 

Sometimes I do actual research on your behalf, sometimes I just point you in the right direction to find answers on your own!

I post a Q&A every Thursday, more often if possible.

 
Image by Stuart Miles on FreeDigitalPhotos.net
 

September 4, 2015

Call For Genealogy Rock Star Nominations

Call For Genealogy Rock Star Nominations
Time for a bit of fun. You can nominate your favourite genealogist for John Reid's Rock Star Genealogist contest. Check out the list of nominees and add your own if he or she is missing.

From the website:  

"Rockstar genealogists are those who give "must attend" presentations at family history conferences or as webinars. Who, when you see a new family history article or publication by that person, makes it a must buy. Who you hang on their every word on a blog, podcast or newsgroup, or follow avidly on Facebook or Twitter?"



Image Credit by Stuart Miles on FreeDigitalPhotos.net



September 3, 2015

Video: Showing a Finished Family Tree Book Created on Shutterfly

2:12 p.m. Eastern Time
LIVE on #Periscope: Showing a finished family tree book using Shutterfly

This video is now on Periscope TV for the next 24 hours. You can also find it on my Olive Tree Genealogy YouTube Channel as  Creating a Memory Book in Shutterfly (Tutorial 4)

Review: The 15 Habits of Highly Frugal Genealogists

Review: The 15 Habits of Highly Frugal Genealogists
My good friend and fellow genealogist Thomas MacEntee has published another great book.

The book is entitled The 15 Habits of Highly Frugal Genealogists and is available at Amazon Canada at  The 15 Habits of Highly Frugal Genealogists

The full price is $3.95 CAN/$2.99 USD but it will be available for FREE download starting Friday 4 September 2015 through Sunday 6 September 2015

You can also find this book at Amazon.com

Anybody can read Kindle books even without a Kindle device with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets, and computers.  

Reading the book last night I was amazed at how many tips and ideas Thomas has for saving money on genealogy-related items. 

I wish I'd known about #24 and #29 last week! That's right, I said 24 and 29 because Thomas didn't stop at 15 tips. There are 33 helpful tips in total. 

Mark your calendars for September 4 and make sure you take advantage of this FREE offer!