August 24, 2016

Looking for Descendants of Mutiny on the Bounty Mutineers

HMS Bounty List of Mutineers
Here's an interesting DNA story. Phys.org writes that
"Ten pigtails of hair thought to be from seven mutineers of "Mutiny on the Bounty" fame and three of their female Polynesian companions will be analysed in a new collaboration between the Pitcairn Islands Study Centre at Pacific Union College (California, US) and the forensic DNA group at King's College London (UK)."
Since there are no hair roots in the saved pigtails, Y-DNA is not possible which means DNA analysis will not be able to trace male ancestry of the pigtail owners. However researchers are hopeful that mitochondrial DNA can be extracted. This will provide details of their maternal ancestry.

The pigtails on display in the US were housed in a nineteenth-century cylindrical tobacco tin. Also with the locks of hair was a handkerchief said to have belonged to Sarah, the daughter of William McCoy, one of the Bounty mutineers.
A worn, faded label with the pigtails notes that it is attached to the hair of William McCoy. The mutineer McCoy died on Pitcairn Island in 1800. Notes written on the label also state that the pigtails are of seven of the mutineers of H.M.S. Bounty and "also that of three of the Tahitian women," who accompanied the mutineers to Pitcairn in 1789.
Continue reading Forensic analysis of pigtails to help identify original 'mutineers of H.M.S. Bounty'

August 22, 2016

5 Ways to Jumpstart Your Genealogy When it has Stalled

Ah, the proverbial brick wall. We all hit it at one time or another. You've searched every single document you can think of but you simply can't get past a certain time period or event for an ancestor.

Maybe you can't find Grandmother Mabel on that 1850 census but you have her in 1860 and you know she is hiding somewhere!

Perhaps Great-grandfather James is keeping his Irish origins hidden and you can't go any further unless you can figure out where in Ireland you need to look!

That's when you need to jumpstart your genealogy research. You need fresh ideas, fresh eyes and you need to be rejuvenated.

Here are 5 Ways to Jumpstart Your Genealogy:

1. Revisit and review old research
Take out all your research on that brickwall ancestor. Go over it again. Read it carefully, analyze it, see if there are clues there you might have missed the first time around. I've written about my own reviews of old research and the new clues Ive found at Why Review Old Genealogy Research? and Everyone Makes Mistakes: Why You Should Review Your Research Notes 
 
2. Switch to a different ancestor
Sometimes it's time to set Grandmother Mabel aside for a bit and work on someone else. when you are ready to go back to the puzzle of Grandmother Mabel, you may find that fresh eyes will make all the difference in the world.

3. Find a genealogy buddy who will brainstorm with you 
I always brainstorm with my husband when I have a challenging genealogy mystery. It's beneficial to have someone approach the mystery with a different outlook. Often that person comes up with something that you didn't think of.

4. Make a chronological timeline of your ancestor's life events.
This is one of the most helpful ways to organize your thoughts and see at a glance where the holes are in your research. Making a timeline for one of my husband's challenging ancestors I noted that I had his baptism record, immigration record, marriage record, births of children, death of his wife and then his death.

However I did not have a record of land he might have purchased or rented and that sent me off a hunt for those records. To my surprise there was mention of him selling his land to his wife for $1.00 then buying it back two years later. That in turn led me to think about what happened in those two years? Why had he sold the land and then bought it back? Long story short, eventually I found out he had gone to jail in that time.

5. Take a break
Yep that's right. Sometimes it's time to say "Enough!". Put your genealogy aside and go for a walk, or out for lunch with friends, or to a movie. Do something relaxing such as read a book, or visit a museum....  do something completely different, something that is fun for you. You'll come back to the puzzle refreshed and eager to get at it again.

August 21, 2016

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album L4

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.


Loose photo. Group of soldiers with their nurses

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with her permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right­hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left­hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"



August 20, 2016

Our Immigrant Ancestors: Jan Snediker to New Netherland (New York)

There is a lot of discussion about immigration in America right now. Tempers have flared, and different groups hold various strong opinions. There is also Brexit, where immigration was a large focus of the recent vote which resulted in the U.K. leaving the E.U.

I've been following this for several months and it occurs to me that those of us in Canada, America, and Australia have immigrant ancestors. Have you researched yours? Do you know who they were, why they came to your country and when? Do you know how they fared once settled in their new land? Were they welcomed? Were they shunned? Was their discrimination based on their religion or ethnic origin? These are all questions that are important, and interesting to discover. With that in mind, I'm the dedicating Saturdays (as many as needed) as the day to join me in discussing your immigrant ancestors.

You will be able to read any you are interested in by using the keyword Immigrant Ancestors. I'm going to share each week what I know of my immigrant ancestors to North America (whether that is USA or Canada)

My 9th great-grandfather was Jan Snediker. He was born circaa 1608 in Oldenberg, Germany and died at Midwont (Flatbush), Long Island, in May 1679.

An article "The European Origin of the Snedeker Family" by Jeff Snedeker with Pim Nieuwenhuis and Ted Snediker, New Netherland Connections 1 (1996) provided me with a great deal of interesting and well-documented information about Jan.

Jans Suycker, shoemaker, was a witness at the 1641 New Amsterdam baptism of Albert, son of Albert Cuynen.

Jan first married Grietje Michiels in Sloterdyk North Holland in May 1632, and had one known daughter - Annitgen born circa 1634. At his  marriage in 1632 he is recorded with his patronymic of Gerritsz

May 9, 1632 Marriage. Netherlands, Noord-Holland Province, Church Records, 1523-1948

On 10 Aug 1636 Jan married Annatje Ruys, daughter of Christian Ruys & Cornelia [Ruys], in Amsterdam Holland.

July 27, 1636 Marriage Intention.Netherlands, Noord-Holland Province, Church Records, 1523-1948

Jan and Annatje came to New Netherland (New York) between 1636 and 1640.
Jan and Anntje's children were
  • Jannetje Jans (<1640-1709)
  • Gerret Jansz (ca1640-1692)
  • Tryntje (ca1642-<1681)
  • my ancestor Styntie Jans baptised 23 Feb 1641/42 in New Amsterdam who later married Steven Wolfertszen Ecker
In 1677 Jan Snediker married for a third time to Egbertie Jans.

August 19, 2016

5 Genealogy Blogs You Need to Follow

Olive Tree Genealogy was very honoured to be one of the 5 blogs named as 5 Genealogy Blogs You Need to Follow on LifePosts.

Quoting from their site "Scratching the surface of your genealogy lines may be daunting and overwhelming at first. Luckily there are several genealogy blogs packed with advice, resources, and insight. We’ve searched high and low for the best of the best genealogy bloggers out there that you should keep an eye on."

Check out the other 4 genealogy blogs mentioned at  5 Genealogy Blogs You Need to Follow

August 17, 2016

3 Abandoned Children Find Each Other Years Later

This is an amazing and heart-warming story of three adults, each abandoned during a 3-year time span in Prince Rupert British Columbia, who have found each other. Each baby was left on a doorstep and found shortly after birth.

Janet Keall writes
 "Around my 18th birthday, I felt compelled to start this search [for birth family]. Over a 20-year period, I had no success until, in the last few months, I found a biological half-brother named Kevin and a biological half-sister named Kathie Rennie. We were all abandoned in Prince Rupert over a 39-month period."
It was DNA testing that proved the three were half-siblings.  Keall adds that "the three of us are now spending time together and getting to know our new-found families and have committed to unite on our family search for our biological mother and fathers."

Read the full story at Abandoned as babies, siblings find each other

The siblings' website at http://www.rupertsbaby.com/ provides more details. Perhaps a reader will recognize something that might help the siblings.

August 15, 2016

Heads Up! Blogarama Violating Copyright?

Copyright protection is a very important issue, both online and offline. I have written about Copyright Issues many times on Olive Tree Genealogy blog. See Copyright Issues

But first, what is the definition of copyright? From the Merriam-Webster dictionary:

the exclusive legal right to reproduce, publish, sell, or distribute the matter and form of something

Basically it means if I write and publish an article on my blog or my website, and someone copies it without my permission and republish it elsewhere, that person has violated my copyright. It does not matter whether or not they gave attribution to me as the author, it's still a copyright violation.

It's heads up time again. Another splogger has hit the genealogy community. According to techtarget.com, a splog (spam blog) is a fake blog created solely to promote affiliated Web sites, with the intent of skewing search results and artificially boosting traffic.

Blogarama has many genealogy blog posts on their site - mine included - without permission.

Thomas MacEntee first brought this to my attention with his post  Splog Alert – Blogarama Violating Copyright

When I went to the site and checked my name Olive Tree Genealogy  I found twenty-five (25!) of my articles and images posted without my permission.  That's called copyright violation.

Heads up to the genealogy community - if you have a blog, you may want to check to see if your articles have been copied without permission. Here's what to do if you are a victim.

1. Contact Site Owners

Trying to contact the site owners of Blogarama doesn't work because they have carefully made sure there is no contact information on their site. Their WhoIs information shows they are a private registration so there is no information to be found there.

2. Contact the Host of the Site

I wrote to enom.com, who I thought was their hosting company, with this email:
To whom it may concern
You are the hosting company for blogarama.com
Blogarama.com is using my copyrighted material (writing and images) without my permission. My blog is http://olivetreegenealogy.blogspot.com

http://www.blogarama.com/blogs/513127-olive-tree-genealogy-blog shows a list of 25 (twenty-five!) articles and blog posts taken and republished without my permission. There may be more. 
Kindly see that blogarama.com remove *all* my blog posts and articles from their site or shut them down completely.  
Enom.com very quickly replied, stating they are the domain registrar for Blogarama, but not the host. They advised me to ping Blogarama for the IP address which would allow me to find the name of the host. I did that and found that their host is cloudflare.com. I sent them my email outlining my concerns.



UPDATE: Cloudfare informs that the actual host server is Linode.com so please direct your complaint email there

3. File a Policy Violation Complaint with Google

I also filed a Policy Violation complaint with Google since Blogarama has Google ads. Google will pull their ads if a site violates their rules so at least I can hit Blogarama in the pocketbook with my complaint.

4. File a DMCA Complaint

You can also file a DMCA Complaint  The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law that helps stop copyright infringement on the Internet. There is a DMCA generator you can use if you are not sure how to do this.

I'm very happy to announce that those 25 articles I wrote that were republished without my permission, have been removed from Blogarama! It didn't take long. I also don't see Google ads on the site anymore so another win. 


UPDATE: Two more bloggers have had their articles removed after taking these steps.

If you want to learn more about copyright in the USA and Canada, see US Copyright Office and Canada Intellectual Property Office 

August 14, 2016

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album L 5

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.
Group Staff Photo. No further info

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with her permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right­hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left ­hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"